Race Cards

  • when: Installation Hours: Wed 18 @ 5-9pm, Thur 19, Fri 20, Sat 21 @ 1-8pm, Sun 22 @ 1-5pm, Durational Performance: Sat 21 @ 2pm (4 hrs), April 2018
  • where: The Mastrogeorge Theater > 130 Pedernales St, Ste 318B
  • Selina Thompson
  • Supported by Farnham Maltings & Caravan

This is a free event. Reservations not required.

A room containing 1000 questions about race, written by Selina Thompson in five sittings across the 2018 Fusebox Festival. You’re invited to answer one of them.

65. Are you black, or are you ‘new black’?

170. What is the long term psychological impact of white supremacy on people of colour?

220. My mum does not talk about race anymore. It makes her uncomfortable, tired. Will this happen to me?

307. Why do people assume that racism will just passively die out if we wait long enough?

440. Are you angry?

541. What ever happened to Kony 2012?

660. Who is more problematic – famous racist Nigel Farage, or the liberal journalist politely asking him questions?

720. When does it all end?

From Fusebox
How many questions do you have about race? Selina Thompson has a thousand, and counting. When asked a question, sometimes it’s not about having the right answer, but about starting a difficult, necessary conversation, about asking ourselves and our communities to challenge our own assumptions and beliefs. Selina Thompson’s installation and performance, comprised of 1,000 questions about race painstakingly transcribed onto note cards, can be thought of as generous invitations to start a conversation and reflect critically on the complexities and intersections of identity. An evolving archive and research project, Race Cards provides an important opportunity to reflect, ask questions of ourselves, and contribute to an archive of feelings, memories, and ideas that too often go unspoken.

There will be a durational reading of all 1000 questions on Sat, April 21 @ 2 PM.

Presented at Fusebox with support by Farnham Maltings & Caravan

Supported by Buzzcut, Forest Fringe and Fierce FWD. Seed commissioned by Camden People’s Theatre and Leeds Library through Room 700.

      

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